Cultivating An Organic Garden – Tips To Use Right Now

 

 

Ever wanted to try your hand at gardening? Vegetable patches can be a great way to immerse yourself into the outdoors. They can also be a great supplement to your cooking. Fresh, home-grown organic vegetables often taste better than the supermarket substitutes, and they’re very easy to grow when given the right tips.

Select perennials to reduce the amount of care your garden requires. Plants that return year after year usually require only a modicum of weeding and pruning. Edible perennials, such as asparagus, rhubarb, and sorrel, can provide an excellent salad addition for your household without causing too much work for you.

If you would like to create an eye-catching fall garden with a lot of height and contrasting colors, try planting spiky plants like the New Zealand flax, the yucca or tall ornamental grasses. Add drama with texture and color by adding chartreuse plants like the Golden Spirit smoke bush or the Tiger Eyes sumac. To contrast the chartreuse color, plant purple plants alongside the chartreuse plants like the Black Lace elderberry or Loropetalum.

Grow vegetables and fruits to drink. Often overlooked yet easy to grow are items that can be made into fantastic and nutritious drinks. These berries and fruit juices can be frozen or canned or made into wine and hard cider. A well made apple wine or blueberry wine can start at $10-12 a bottle, so this can also be a profit available with the garden.

To maximize the benefits of compost, put it in your garden about two weeks before you plant. Compost actually needs time to integrate with soil and once you combine the two they need time to stabilize. Plan to gather enough compost to fertilize your garden a couple of weeks ahead of planting to produce healthier and stronger plants.

Plants are generally best grown in their native environments. Grapes for example, require a dry, hot environment to maximize their growth while minimizing the amount of microbes that are dangerous to them. When growing plants it’s important to realize their region of origin; generally it’s best to identify the local varieties of horticultural species.

Fertilize the soil you are going to plant in three weeks before planting. By doing this, you are helping the soil improve its ability to retain nutrients and water, which are especially important for new plants. There are many fertilizers from which to choose at your local gardening store.

Use stones as plant markers if you want to keep a natural looking motif. You can write with permanent magic marker on the flat side of stones and surround your plant with them. That way you will be able to tell what type of plants you have without having an unsightly white mark.

As outlined in this article, growing your own vegetables is simple and beneficial. Physically appealing and mouth-wateringly good, home-grown vegetables are simply a matter of seconds of research, minutes of work, and a few weeks or months of growing time. While results aren’t instant, they certainly are gratifying and can provide you with a bountiful supply of food.